Marine Corps Life in Iwakuni | MCAS Iwakuni



Marines share their work experiences while stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan. The Marines talked about some of the benefits of living and working in Japan.

(U.S. Marine Corps video by Cpl. Donato Maffin and Cpl. Waiyan Tin)

Marines Aircraft Takeoff From Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni



This video contains footage of Marines conduction alternative landing zone training on Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni.

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Credit: Calvin Hilt

US Marines Testing F-18 Fighter Jet Engines – Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni



Marines testing engines for F-18s on Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni. To view the story involving this footage, search Marines test and repair engines to keep jets flying high.

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Electronic Attack Squadron 132 on Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni



Electronic Attack Squadron 132 on Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni.

The Japanese government bought a large portion of what is today MCAS Iwakuni in 1938, with the view of establishing a naval air station. They commissioned the new base 8 July 1940. When World War II started, the Iwakuni air station was used as a training and defense base. The station housed 96 trainers and 150 Zero fighter planes on the airstrip. In September 1943, a branch of the Etajima Naval Academy was established here, with approximately 1,000 cadets undergoing training in the Basic, Junior and Senior Officer’s schools at any one time. American B-29’s bombed Iwakuni in May and August 1945, concentrating on the oil refinery and Rail Transport Office or train station areas. The last air raid took place just a day before the war was brought to a close.
The first allies to reach Iwakuni at the war’s end were a group of U.S. Marines who had signed papers ending the conflict for the Japanese

air base. After the end of World War II, various military forces from the United States, Britain, Australia, and New Zealand occupied the base and it was repaired by No. 5 Airfield Construction Squadron RAAF. It was designated a Royal Australian Air Force Base in 1948. The Americans first occupied the base in 1950 to use it as a springboard for aircraft heading to the Korean War. In 1952, the base officially became a United States military base.

News Strike – Corporals aboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni go back to the basics



In a way, every time a Marine picks up an NCO sword and heads to the drill field, he is reconnecting to his forebears as far back as the 18th century. The Marines of corporals course on Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni demonstrate this linking to tradition, discipline and confidence for reasons other than concentrating fire on an enemy. Lance Corporal Jonathan Smith hit the parade deck to find out why.

Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni strives for pedestrian safety



WHY DID THE DEVIL DOG CROSS THE ROAD: Find out how pedestrian safety on MCAS Iwakuni is affected by the influx of new base residents and how the Iwakuni Provost Marshals Office is handling it.

US NAVY’S AWACS E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft landing at MCAS Iwakuni



This video contains footage of the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft landing for the first time at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan. Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 125 landed at MCAS Iwakuni to help support stability in the Indo-Asia Pacific region.