67th Birthday of the Philippine Marine Corps 11/8/2017



Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City
November 7, 2017

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte graced the 67th Birthday of the Philippine Marine Corps (PMC), and led the awarding of plaques and ceremonial cake cutting at the Bonifacio Naval Station in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City.

In his message, the President said he would release PhP500-million to be allotted to the wounded and disabled soldiers, which will be coursed directly to Department of National Defense (DND) Secretary Delfin Lorenzana for speedy disbursement.

“I want ‘yung mabilisan na, sabi ko, Ibigay ko na lang sa opisina ‘yan ni Delfin and siya na ang bahala for the immediate release of the medicines and to shop around for the titaniums. It’s quite expensive but in the long run, it would have its benefits and make the soldiers happy again… I love my soldiers and I love my police. And you can be very sure that I am there when the moment needs me. Nandiyan ako sa tabi ninyo,” the President said.

On the ongoing West Philippine Sea disputes, the President said he had asserted the Philippines’ territorial claims over Pag-asa Island and similar small territories to Chinese President Xi Jinping, who, in turn, gave his assurance that he will not touch nor build anything on the Scarborough Shoal.

During the event, the President conferred medals and plaques of recognition to 12 PMC soldiers and private organizations that rendered invaluable support and service to the PMC at the height of Marawi crisis. The occasion also paid tribute to its fallen soldiers killed-in-action.

Organized on November 7, 1950, under the orders of President Elpidio Quirino and Ramon Magsaysay, then Secretary of National Defense, the Philippine Marine Corps today is considered one of the elite forces of the Philippines, operating against communist insurgencies, Moro rebellion, terrorism, as well as to promote peace and development, living up to its motto: ‘Karangalan, Katungkulan, Kabayanihan’.

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DUTERTE LATEST NEWS NOVEMBER 07, 2017 | 67th BIRTHDAY OF PH MARINE CORPS LEADS AWARDING PLAQUES



President Rodrigo Roa Duterte graces the 67th Birthday of the Philippine Marine Corps, and leads the awarding of plaques and ceremonial cake cutting at the Bonifacio Naval Station in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City.
Organized on November 7, 1950, under the orders of President Elpidio Quirino and Ramon Magsaysay, then Secretary of National Defense, the Philippine Marine Corps served as the A Company of the Philippine Fleet’s 1st Marine Battalion, with its first Philippine marines trained by United States Army and United States Marine Corps to perform combat and amphibious duties.
Today, the Philippine Marine Corps is considered one of the elite forces of the Philippines, operating against communist insurgencies, Moro rebellion, terrorism, as well as to promote peace and development, living up to its motto: ‘Karangalan, Katungkulan, Kabayanihan’ (Honor, Duty, Valor).

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Live: President Duterte attends the 67th anniversary of the Philippine Marine Corps – Nov. 7, 2017



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WAR WITNESS. SYRIA WAR SAA 11th TANK DIVISION u0026 67th ARMORED BRIGADE WITH Ru AF SUPPORT



WAR WITNESS. SYRIA WAR SAA 11th TANK DIVISION u0026 67th ARMORED BRIGADE WITH Ru AF SUPPORT .
The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) grew out of the unrest of the 2011 Arab Spring and escalated to armed conflict after President Bashar al-Assad’s government violently repressed a revolt. The Syrian government has since then refused efforts to negotiate with what it describes as armed terrorist groups. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian Government and its various supporters, a loose alliance of Sunni Arab rebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces, Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front) who often co-operate with the Sunni rebels, and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The factions receive substantial support from foreign actors, leading many to label the conflict a proxy war waged by both regional and global powers.
Syrian opposition groups formed the Free Syrian Army (FSA) and seized control of the area surrounding Aleppo and parts of southern Syria. Over time, factions of the Syrian opposition split from their original moderate position to pursue an Islamist vision for Syria, as al-Nusra Front and ISIL. In the north, Syrian government forces largely withdrew to fight the FSA, allowing the Kurdish YPG to move in and proclaim de facto autonomy. In 2015 the YPG joined forces with Arab, Assyrian, Armenian and some Turkmen groups, forming the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), while most Turkmen groups remained with the FSA.
International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL and rebel groups of severe human rights violations and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a refugee crisis. On 1 February 2016, a formal start of the mediated Geneva Syria peace talks was announced by the United Nations but fighting continues.
On 29 July 2011, seven defecting Syrian officers formed the Free Syrian Army (FSA), composed of defected Syrian Armed Forces officers and soldiers, aiming “to bring this government (the Assad government) down” with united opposition forces. On 31 July, a nationwide crackdown nicknamed the “Ramadan Massacre” resulted in the death of at least 142 people and hundreds of injuries.
On 23 August, a coalition of anti-government groups called the Syrian National Council was formed. The council, based in Turkey, attempted to organize the opposition. The opposition, however, including the FSA, remained a fractious collection of political groups, longtime exiles, grassroots organizers and armed militants divided along ideological, ethnic and/or sectarian lines.
Throughout August, Syrian forces stormed major urban centres and outlying regions, and continued to attack protests. On 14 August, the Siege of Latakia continued as the Syrian Navy became involved in the military crackdown for the first time. Gunboats fired heavy machine guns at waterfront districts in Latakia, as ground troops and security agents backed by armour stormed several neighbourhoods. The Eid ul-Fitr celebrations, which began at the end of August, were muted after security forces fired on protesters gathered in Homs, Daraa, and the suburbs of Damascus.
By September 2011, Syrian rebels were engaged in an active insurgency campaign in many parts of Syria. A major confrontation between the FSA and the Syrian armed forces occurred in Rastan. From 27 September to 1 October, Syrian government forces, backed by tanks and helicopters, led an offensive on the town of Al-Rastan in Homs Governorate, in order to drive out army defectors. The 2011 battle of Rastan between government forces and the FSA was the longest and most intense action until that time. After a week, the FSA was forced to retreat from Rastan. To avoid government forces, the leader of the FSA, Colonel Riad Asaad, retreated to Turkey. By October, the FSA started to receive active support from Turkey, which allowed the rebel army to operate its command and headquarters from the country’s southern Hatay Province close to the Syrian border, and its field command from inside Syria.
In October 2011, clashes between government and army units which had defected were being regularly reported. During the first week of the month, sustained clashes were reported in Jabal al-Zawiya in the mountains of Idlib Governorate. Syrian rebels also captured most of Idlib city. In mid-October, clashes in Idlib Governorate included the towns of Binnish and Hass in the governorate near the mountain range of Jabal al-Zawiya. In late October, clashes occurred in the northwestern town of Maarrat al-Nu’man between government forces and defected soldiers, and near the Turkish border, where 10 security agents and a deserter were killed in a bus ambush. It was not clear if the defectors linked to these incidents were connected to the FSA.